It’s well known that veterans benefits for aid and attendance will help pay for long term care needed by a wartime veteran, or the widow or widower of one.

But what about Jane, who needs care in an assisted living facility and is married to Bill, a World War II veteran? Any help available there?

Quite possibly, yes!

It’s a little known fact that when a veteran is over the age of 65, the VA will presume a veteran is disabled for purposes of qualifying for a benefit known as the “low income pension.” If Bill qualifies for the full benefit amount – $1,404 a month – that extra will go a long way toward paying the cost of Jane’s care.

Bill should apply if: (1) he meets the usual requirements for low income pension benefits (modest household assets, other than dishonorable discharge, etc.), and (2) cost of care exceeds household income.

Even if household income is greater than the cost of care, but not by more than $1,404, it may still be worth their while to apply for partial benefits.


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