As our population ages, there are new services available to help families cope and make prudent decisions about an aging loved one. Caring for a senior can rapidly become complex and overwhelming. Having one person manage multiple concerns and issues can stretch health care dollars by reducing duplicative services. A geriatric care manager (GCM) can be a great resource.

The GCM coordinates care for seniors or disabled adults. They have a variety of educational backgrounds which may include social work or gerontology. They evaluate and coordinate care to assist seniors to maximize their independence while maintaining a safe environment.

Geriatric care managers can develop a comprehensive plan to make decisions about:

  • housing
  • home care services
  • medical management
  • communicating the changing needs of the senior
  • social activities
  • legal services

GCM’s can help coordinate and address:

  • bill paying
  • transportation to doctor appointments
  • home safety needs
  • compliance with medication regimens

GCM’s are invaluable when a senior has limited or no family support in the context of complicated medical conditions. These days the adult children frequently live in other cities and cannot provide the hands on support and decision making that is necessary to keep a parent safe. Sometimes family members have bitter disputes about crucial decisions that are never made until a crisis occurs.

Consider a GCM if you would like the peace of mind that can result when you know your parent has an objective and knowledgeable person whom they trust. Contact our office if you would like a referral, or to discuss any elder law issues.

 


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