Many of the challenges our clients face as they age stem from loss of cognitive ability.

They need to rely on the agents they appoint in their powers of attorney and health care directives because they can’t process information and make decision the way they used to.

With all the advances in health and medical care that have extended life expectancies, treatments for cognitive impairments remain scant.

So it was exciting to hear in the past week about a pilot study in which patients taking the drug nilotinib experienced improvements in Parkinson’s disease symptoms, including improvement in cognitive ability. You can read, and listen to, NPR’s coverage of this development here.

The story concludes with a report that the drug will next be tested with Alzheimer’s patients.


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